Nicolas Kruchten

Nicolas Kruchten
is a software developer
in Montréal, Québec, Canada.

Kernel Density Estimation and Analysis Tool

Kernel Density Estimation and Analysis Tool

In 2005, I was contracted to create a program to support research into the application of a statistical technique called Kernel Density Estimation to the study of global poverty. The result of this contract (which I worked on with my friend and occasional colleague David de Koning) is the Kernel Density Estimation and Analysis tool which I have just released on Github under an open-source license.

The research (which, to be clear, wasn't done by me) resulted in a very interesting paper called Kernel Density Estimation Based on Grouped Data: The Case of Poverty Assessment.

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Galapagos

Galapagos

In 2003, I wrote a neat and powerful piece of software called Galapagos for my 4th-year undergraduate thesis (download PDF). It was a framework for the development of advanced (i.e. distributed, parallel and/or hybrid) evolutionary algorithms, applicable to a wide range of computational challenging optimization problems. I applied it to a variety of transportation-related problems at the University of Toronto.

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Rubicon Tech Talk: The Algorithms Automating Advertising


I was invited to speak on a panel at a Rubicon Project product launch, and this is the video of the event.

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Volunteer Database for Santropol Roulant

Volunteer Database for Santropol Roulant

There’s an organization in Montreal I think is awesome called Santropol Roulant which, among other things, has a meals-on-wheels operation. They have hundreds of volunteers and wanted to upgrade the system they used to store their volunteer information, so I helped them out, and I’ve open-sourced the results, in case any other non-profit wants a very simple volunteer-list management system.

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My QR-Code Business Card

My QR-Code Business Card

This is the machine-readable back of my new nerdy QR-code business card!

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Peeking Into the Black Box, Part 2 - Algorithm Meets World

Peeking Into the Black Box, Part 2 - Algorithm Meets World

In Part 1 of this series, I claimed that Datacratic’s RTB algorithm is able to take advantage of other bidders’ sub-optimal behaviour and navigate around publisher price floor in order to achieve advertiser goals. I then described the algorithm, which applies what can be called a “bid truthfully, pace economically” approach. In this second part, I show how this algorithm can in fact live up to these claims.

When you bid truthfully and pace economically, you are always trying to allocate your budget to the auctions which look like the best deals, whether that means that the user is very likely to click, or that the price is low because fewer bidders are in the running or there is no publisher price floor.

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Peeking Into the Black Box, Part 1 - Datacratic’s RTB Algorithms

Peeking Into the Black Box, Part 1 - Datacratic’s RTB Algorithms

This article is about the statistical and economic theory that underlies Datacratic’s real-time bidding strategies, as a follow-up to my previous article on how we apply control theory to pace our spending, which I’m grandfathering in as “Part 0” of this series called Peeking Into the Black Box.

At Datacratic, we develop real-time bidding algorithms. In order to accomplish advertiser goals, our algorithms automatically take advantage of other bidders’ sub-optimal behaviour, as well as navigate around publisher price floors. These are bold claims, and we want our partners to understand how our technology works and be comfortable with it. No “trust the Black Box” value proposition for us. In Part 1 of this series I’ll explain the basics of our algorithm, first how we determine how much to bid, and then how we determine when to bid. In Part 2 I’ll show how this approach responds in some real-world situations.

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Peeking Into the Black Box, Part 0 - RTB Pacing, is everyone doing it wrong?

Peeking Into the Black Box, Part 0 - RTB Pacing, is everyone doing it wrong?

I've written some follow-up posts to this one, as a series called Peeking into the Black Box, so I'm grandfathering this post in as "Part 0" of the series.

I read an interesting post on the AppNexus tech blog about their campaign monitoring tools and the screenshots there almost exclusively contained various pacing measurements. Some of the graphs there looked a lot like the ones I had sketched up while trying to solve the pacing problem for our real-time bidding (RTB) client. Here are the basics of the problem: if someone gives you a fixed amount of money to run a display advertising campaign over a specific time period, it's generally advisable to spend exactly that amount of money, spread out reasonably evenly over that time-period. Over-spending could mean you're on the hook for the difference, and under-spending doesn't look great if you want repeat business. And if you don't spend it evenly, you'll get some pissed-off customers, like this guy who had his $50 budget blown in minutes. Sounds obvious, right? Apparently it's harder than it looks!

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Real Time Bidding, Characterized


There doesn't appear to be a good Wikipedia entry for RTB for me to link at the moment, when I want to blog about it so I'll draft my own explanation here. (Edit: there is an entry now, but I like my characterization better!) Keep in mind while reading this that I'm looking at RTB as a software engineer with an interest in economics, rather than as an ad industry veteran!

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Using make to Orchestrate Machine Learning Tasks

Using make to Orchestrate Machine Learning Tasks

One of the things we do at Datacratic is to use machine learning algorithms to optimize real-time bidding (RTB) policies for online display advertising. This means we train software models to predict, for example, the cost and the value of showing a given ad impression, and we then incorporate these prediction models into systems which make informed bidding decisions on behalf of our clients to show their ads to their potential customers.

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© Nicolas Kruchten 2010-2017